BIGGER & BOLDER

BY DOUGLAS KING

To say the art scene in Dallas/ Fort Worth is getting bigger would be an understatement. Not only have we seen the growth in the past few years of the Dallas Arts District, the Design District and the Dallas Art Fair, but the individual pieces of art are growing as well. It is not unheard of for art larger than 7 feet to be purchased on a consistent basis from artists and galleries.

And while the artists and galleries have a clear vision of what lies ahead, one of the current trends is abstract art. But Dallas is known for its variety and diversity, so galleries are having success with everything from traditional to contemporary art.

One thing that everyone agrees on is that Dallas and Fort Worth are perfectly, and centrally, located for collectors who no longer feel the need to travel to the coasts or abroad. Everything they need and want is right here.

Dallas Style & Design is excited to launch this first, special Arts issue (which will reoccur every spring). We talked with artists and galleries in Dallas/ Fort Worth to discuss what is trending, what makes Dallas unique and what lies ahead. We also discussed how art can be used in home interiors and how galleries can work with interior designers to bring homeowners exactly what they need.

LuminArté Fine Art Gallery
Jamie Labar, owner of LuminArté, is excited about what she sees taking place in Dallas and how it is becoming an international destination for collectors and art lovers. She believes Russian avant-garde artwork will be receiving more attention in the coming year, fueled in part by recent exhibitions and higher auction prices.

In addition to the Dallas Arts District and Art Fair, Labar notes that Dallas has premier, well-funded institutions, such as the DMA and Nasher, as well as private entities like the Pump House, The Warehouse and The Power Station, all wrapped in a low-key, Tex-centric setting.

Labar believes Dallas has changed because of a new generation of collectors and a supportive art gallery community, now filled with more galleries and more project spaces that are supported through both private and city investment. She also notes that the growing numbers of artists showing here are more acclaimed and have international followings.

As a designer herself, through LuminArté Design, Labar is sensitive to how galleries and interior designers can work more closely. “Galleries are an invaluable source to edit and select works for collections as well as interiors, both residential and commercial,” she says. “At LuminArté we have an exclusive online inventory of more than 150 artists and literally thousands of works. By working closely with artists and designers, we can help find the perfect piece for any project, large or small.”

Samuel Lynne Galleries
“Ten years ago there was really no central art district,” says JD Miller, owner of Samuel Lynne Galleries. “Now we have the downtown Dallas Arts District, The Design District, Dragon Street and the Dallas Art Fair. When it comes to fine art and the arts, this city is on fire and all these dedicated districts are a result.”

In Dallas everything is larger than life and the art is a reflection of that. The average size of the art at Samuel Lynne Galleries keeps getting bigger and bigger. Clients for both commercial and residential projects want art that fits the grand scale of their architecture and interior design.

The gallery has also seen a trend toward more abstract work. “A decade ago it was equally divided between abstract and representational, and now we place about 10 abstract works for every representational/ traditional work,” says Miller.

Miller notes that it seems that more and more interior designers are helping their clients choose fine art. “It used to be that art was a last thought when designing a home or office,” he says. “Now clients’ art collections are becoming more of a focus and less of an afterthought. We have had designers come in with their clients and choose a significant work of art around which they can design an entire room. As we build relationships, we are finding opportunities to refer potential clients to designers who see placing fine art as part of their services.”

Christopher Martin Gallery

Christopher Martin has found that, in recent years, interior designers have grown to perform the function of art advisor for their clients. “The clients’ combined budgets for art and design allow designers to propose bold visions for their clients’ spaces, and we have been asked many times to provide art for the projects or have our artists commissioned to create site-specific artworks,” he says.

“Dallas audiences appreciate the direct relationship that they can develop with an artist and in turn artists strive to create better experiences for their clients,” says Martin. Martin notes that over the past five years the art scene has decisively grown in Dallas, and he sees the improvement and ongoing redevelopment of the Dallas Design District as key to the vitality of the arts.

Christopher Martin Gallery finds, in addition to the trend toward larger and bolder statement pieces, that clients are gravitating toward modular pieces—works done in multiple sections that a client can participate in configuring, thus creating a unique expression that reflects their taste and style. The gallery has also noticed a tendency toward monochromatic palettes, subtle hues, and sophisticated and modern patterns.


Southwest Gallery
Variety and diversity of art styles, from traditional to contemporary, are what Southwest Gallery finds clients are seeking. The gallery, known for its huge array of offerings, has found that clients have a desire for more options, and those same clients are coming to understand that everything doesn’t have to “match.” Instead, they are encouraged to indulge and embrace their own aesthetic.

September marks the 50th year in the art business for the gallery. “As we transition into spring we will be featuring shows that spotlight some of our longstanding artists as well as our newer artists, with firsttime one-man shows that will culminate in a 50 artist group show for the 50th Celebration!” says gallery manager Melissa Butler.

Butler believes that Dallas has become a respected go-to city for art buyers. “Unlike some East Coast and West Coast galleries we have a more realistic selection of art, across all spectrums, styles and pricing, for collecting opportunities,” she says.

In working with designers, Butler notes the desire for galleries and designers to have more confidence in one another’s expertise in their respective fields and to work for a client’s best interest more closely. She also feels there needs to be a collective desire to make pricing more transparent so that the client is not confused about the value of the art pieces they want to acquire.

Beaudry Gallery & Framing
Variety is also the key word at Beaudry Gallery. “We see the art scene in Dallas becoming more adventurous and daring,” says Janardan Meyer, gallery manager. “People are going to be looking for original mediums and original takes on existing mediums. Art forms like graffiti art and resin art will be in demand as well as unique takes on oils and acrylics.”



Meyer points out that Dallas has the good fortune to have a wealth of young burgeoning artists as well as younger collectors with eclectic taste in the arts, and the gallery plans to have shows every month to showcase artists from around the world as well as local talent to feed the desire for variety.

“The art scene has matured drastically in Dallas,” says Meyer. “We see local talent dictating trends and influencing overall direction in the art world. We no longer have to play second fiddle to places like Santa Fe and New York.”

As for galleries working with interior designers, Meyer points out that the galleries have the ability to bring in work that is specifically tailored to the needs of the interior designers they work with, while the designers should be vocal on the particular kinds of pieces they are searching for.

Ginger Fox Gallery
Ginger Fox is finding a continued demand for abstract paintings. “I am working on combining my abstract expressionism and hyperrealism painting styles,” Fox says.

Echoing the sentiments from Beaudry Gallery, Fox doesn’t feel like collectors need to go somewhere else, like Santa Fe or New York, to find “good art.”

“The Dallas art scene is growing, and with the power of social media people are more aware of what is going on,” she says. “Dallas is also gaining more respect all the time with the growing number of significant art events, artists and galleries.”

Because Dallas is centrally located, Fox feels that the city tends to attract artists and others from both coasts as well as outside of the country, giving Dallas a unique opportunity to merge ideas and cultural influences from a variety of locations, which adds to the creativity and expanding Dallas art scene.

Fox works with many interior designers, and she stresses that listening is always a good place to start when building new relationships. “Designers are very busy people, so we always strive to create a relationship that they know they can depend on. We want them to trust that they are going to get unique quality art as efficiently as possible, from the first brushstroke to the last nail in the wall, when they work with us,” Fox says.

Jen Mauldin Gallery
“I opened up Jen Mauldin Gallery to not only show a wealth of talented artist but to be a part of helping to cultivate new artists that will keep the art in Dallas continuously growing,” says Jen Mauldin of her eponymous gallery, located near Ginger Fox Gallery in the Bishop Arts District.

She points out that not only is Dallas home to many passionate collectors but it’s fortunate to have the work of the same great artists who exhibit in Florence, Paris and London. “Best of all, Dallas is a young city and artists have a freedom here that they wouldn’t have in places like New York, where things are more established. People are literally inventing new ways of doing things here daily,” Mauldin says.

For Mauldin, 2017 is a year for exposing the raw beauty and strength in women, depicting bold independence and strength and blurring the lines between masculinity and femininity.

Coming from the interior design industry Mauldin has personally loved working with galleries as a designer. “Collaboration is ideal and the more details a designer can share about the space, colors, timeline and budget the better. It is important for designers to know that galleries and artists are willing to work within the constraints, including commissions or limited edition prints,” she says.

Laura Rathe Fine Art
“The Dallas art community is unique for its cohesiveness. Having participated in many art fairs in cities such as New York and Miami, we think Dallas has one of the best planned events because of how the city comes together in support of the fair,” says Laura Rathe.

In addition to these public events, Rathe also looks forward to hosting private events that bring patrons in close contact with her artists. “We hope to build a community around the work we show, creating intimate relationships between the gallery, our patrons and our artists,” she says.

When working with interior designers Rathe notes that increasingly she sees designers choosing to look at art first when planning their projects. “Many are basically acting as art consultants and taking the initiative to learn about our artists and what’s going on in the galleries, and the effect is greatly enhancing their work,” Rathe says.

Mary Tomás Gallery
Contemporary art is what interests patrons of Mary Tomás Gallery the most. “From minimalist to very layered works, the conceptual aspects are important,” says Tomás. She feels museums and institutions are working in tandem with Dallas galleries to heighten the art viewing experience and that the “maverick” spirit is alive and well, with galleries pushing the envelope to stay fresh and relevant.

“We are thrilled to have added several international artists to our gallery roster who bring new visions to the Dallas audience. Artists from Puerto Rico, Spain, New York, France and Texas bring to the table their inspirations that incorporate their personal experiences and reflect where they live,” Tomás says, echoing how others feel about Dallas becoming a cosmopolitan epicenter for art.

“Our patrons are no longer satisfied with just ‘pretty pictures,’ and they are finding the value in artworks that exude real emotion,” she says.

“Interior designers are seeing the value they can provide their clients by becoming more informed about the art and artists the Dallas galleries have to offer,” says Tomás. She believes a client’s comfort zone can be challenged when it comes to acquiring or investing in artwork, and the guidance of a good interior designer and gallery owner can be critical.

WALL Gallery Kristi Kirkpatrick, owner of WALL Gallery, feels the art scene has been evolving in Dallas over the last decade, with the Dallas Art Fair generating international notice to our fair city, expanding museum collections, and public spaces being filled with colossal, bright sculptures and murals.

With international attention turning to Dallas’ art scene, Kirkpatrick plans to introduce a few international artists to collectors and designers through a rigorous art exhibition schedule. She will also begin exhibiting large-scale sculpture by two different Texas artists, both new to the gallery.

“Art collectors and designers have been focusing on largescale abstracts and geometric art, from black-and-white to full-color scheme. When placed in residential or commercial environments the result is impactful,” Kirkpatrick says. She also notes the trend toward modern art.

Regarding work with interior designers, Kirkpatrick says: “A gallery must have a continued dialogue with designers to make them aware of what is available, or new, as the designers make decisions on current and future projects. It’s very symbiotic as a designer may see their vision through a piece of art and expand on that.”

Crawshay Gallery
For Phil Crawshay, his largeformat digital photography faces a challenge that other art forms do not: The advent of affordable digital equipment, available to everyone, and amateur photographers who share what they ate for breakfast as well as selfies with every outfit change on social media, create an impression that photography is not “fine art.” “While this platform has made expression through visual art more approachable, I believe we will see an increased appreciation of artistry and technique,” Crawshay says. “I think 2017 will see more emphasis on the appreciation of nature and the majesty of the scenery around us, bringing the outside into our homes.”

Recently relocating his studio and gallery to Dallas, Crawshay did so because he feels Dallas is a breeding ground for expression. “With the influx of outsiders seeking affordable space, strong artist-in-residence opportunities and generous grants, collaboration and innovation seem to be bursting onto the scene. From The Fabrication Yard, which provides graffiti artists a voice, to the growing scene in The Cedars, Dallas is a Mecca for new art,” he says.

Crawshay is also optimistic about working with interior designers. “I think a lot of people get rooted in a particular way of working and with particular people. I think more should be done to encourage designers to explore more fully the wide array of talent that is out there but not necessarily well known,” he says.

CINQ Gallery
Scott Dawson, owner of CINQ, sees the art scene in Dallas becoming more progressive. He also sees a shift toward art that evokes simplicity and clarity.

“More people are moving to Texas and more artists want representation in Dallas,” he says. He agrees with others that Dallas’ location, halfway between the major art hubs on the East and West coasts, is a benefit and allows artists and collectors to draw influences from across the country.

In 2017, CINQ plans to paint a large mural on the side of its building. Dawson feels the dozens of events hosted by designers and galleries every month in the Design District is a great way for everyone to network and work together. It also provides a showcase for the diverse style and art in Dallas.

Calina Mishay
Artist Calina Mishay, who paints building-size street art, feels the hottest trend of 2017 will be artists who can master the concept of bringing art to the people in an approachable, interactive and fun way. She feels social media will play a large part in that and the trend she forecasts for the year is, in one word— rebellion.

“I believe we are living in a generation that wants to approach life, love and art in a unique way compared to even our parents’ generation,” Mishay says.

Part of that approach is for artists and interior designers to benefit from each other by keeping the “creating an experience factor” in mind. “If I am not doing street art, I’ll paint one-of-a-kind paintings specifically for a client’s home,” she says. “In the past, I’ve found this works ideally with an interior designer’s big-picture dream while allowing a homeowner to feel connected to the piece they’re hanging in their home.”

Carlyn Ray Designs
Having grown up at her mother’s gallery, which was first at Olla Podrida, Carlyn Ray, owner of Carlyn Ray Designs, has seen the art movement significantly change from the early ’80s until now. “Dallas’ interest has migrated from art and crafts, such as kaleidoscopes and turned wood, into purchasing larger, sophisticated and custom fineart installations,” she says.

Ray feels that Dallas seeks site-specific, monumental and experiential art, which creates an aura of expression, color and energy around the city. “This movement is unlike anywhere else in the world,” she says, “and the exciting part is, the Dallas art movement has just begun gaining momentum.”

With regard to working with interior designers, Ray says: “To me, one of the core pillars of artwork is sharing creativity. I think the designer/gallery relationship should be defined by a willingness to collaborate with the end goal of providing a connection from artist to client. One of the best attributes of having a designer come into our gallery is that they can see various sizes, shapes and colors in our different designs. We never want a designer to feel constrained to what is physically on the wall. We wish to share in the creative process with them and their client. The more creative we can all be together, the more magical the piece.”

LMB Art Glass
“The Dallas community is very forward thinking when it comes to style and taste, which also influences trends. Art really surrounds us in so many ways and people are really taking notice,” says Brooke Weidenbaker, president of LMB Art Glass.

“As a new gallery, we plan to continue to find unique ways to share the beautiful work we have with the city of Dallas. We plan to hold several events throughout the year and are always open to new ideas,” she says.

Part of being open to those new ideas is working with designers who allow her to be included in the whole process. “We love it when designers convey a concept and vision and then we can pull a handful of pieces and bring them to the space to try out and see what works the best,” she says. “Our art is so unique in form that photos really do not do it justice. Clients need to not only see the glass but also touch it and see it throughout the day as the light changes.”

Weidenbaker admits that art is very personal but the common thread is that clients enjoy learning about artists and their work. She says, “At the gallery we follow individual preferences.”

Vetro Glassblowing Studio & Gallery
At Vetro Glassblowing Studio & Gallery in Grapevine, glass artist David Gappa is excited that the awareness of the fascinating, ancient art of glassblowing is really taking root in the metroplex. He believes that people are beginning to see that handblown glass can be much more than a vase or a bowl. Molten glass can be manipulated into complex sculptural forms that serve as objects on a pedestal or elaborate installations that encompass a large space.

“The DFW metroplex has served as a catalyst for glassblowers to establish themselves both infrastructurally and artistically,” Gappa says. “Due to the influx of glass artists integrating within the fabric of Dallas, galleries and glassblowing studios are beginning to take hold here.”


Gappa believes the best way for interior designers to ensure successful artwork within their space is to reach out to the galleries and glassblowing studios early in the proposal phase. “Glass artwork, especially large-scale installations, often require additional architectural bracing or structural mounting hardware to be installed prior to the artwork,” he says.

“Interior designers are one of my favorite groups of professionals to work with, for both residential and commercial projects,” he enthuses. “Not only do they appreciate the fine details of the artwork, but they also understand the spatial complexities of how the glass artwork interacts with the space.”

Holder Dane Gallery
A reoccurring theme is that bigger and bolder is better. As Patricia Bodnyk, owner of Holder Dane Gallery, points out, the healthy economy of Dallas and the large amount of construction going on are creating large venue spaces that require art and offer artists great opportunities. In tandem, the arts have been able to expand not only in dimension but also in the money available to support installations. “Artists prosper as the rapid growth in North Texas creates venues with vast spaces,” Bodnyk says.

She also notes that, “Dallas is unique in that you can find Western realism in the bronze longhorn herd in a downtown park contrasted against the urban, geometric grace of the Margaret Hunt Bridge—cattle to contemporary—both thrive in the healthy Dallas art environment.”

A trend Bodnyk is noticing when working with interior designers is the use of grays and whites, and neutral warm wood colors as the color palette in living spaces. “This lends a backdrop for art that can be bold in geometric pattern and, even more so, cries out for large canvases of color,” she says.

Bodnyk believes that galleries should host more events to introduce interior designers to what specific galleries have to offer as well as to the artists that are able to produce inventory when needed for large-quantity commissions.

Bee Street Studio
Ann Catherine Easterling and her mother, Delaney Campbell, who own and operate Bee Street Studio, believe the attainability of quality original art is a direct result of the growing number of amazingly talented artists who pay attention to interior design trends and keep their price points competitive.

They are excited about the recent renovation of their space and the ability to showcase more work for designers and individuals to view.

“We are able to work very closely with interior designers,” Easterling says, noting that they provide full-service art consultation. “Each experience is unique, as the art selection process can be the start of an entire project or the finishing touch. We strive to make the process easy by learning the specific needs of the project and offering as many relative options as possible.”

Easterling makes a point about framing, saying: “Keep it simple. Let the artwork be the star of the show! A more simple and sleek frame lends an air of sophistication to the space.”

Milan Gallery
Tal Milan, owner of Milan Gallery, is excited that Dallas is experiencing growth not only from new collectors moving to Dallas but also from collectors visiting from around the nation and the world. Because of this, Milan Gallery carries a variety of art to support every taste. “You will have a volume of buyers from the modern genre all the way to the traditional impressionism genre,” he says.

He points out that art collectors are buying everything from contemporary to Texas-style art and from landscapes to vistas of color.

“One leading trend is in large-scale sculptures and new lighted sculpture with unique stands made with LED lighting,” he says.

For 2017, Milan plans to bring old favorites to his gallery, including pop artist Peter Max and Dr. Seuss—who is quickly becoming highly collected. In fact, Milan points out that many museums are collecting the same Dr. Seuss work that the public can purchase.

Regarding his experience with interior designers, Milan says: “My gallery has worked for 45 years alongside interior design teams, and I want to continue to do so as we try hard to bring fabulous artists to our city and the experience that goes with it. We look forward to working hand in hand with designers as we help give their clients the attention to detail they deserve.”

Circuit12 Contemporary Circuit12 owners Gina and Dustin Orlando have also noticed the influx of many new transplants moving to Dallas from larger art markets. This in turn is enticing artists to move here. “The artwork being produced in this region seems to have a voice and an identity of its own,” says Dustin. “However, influences from major art markets, such as New York and LA, are starting to become more apparent and accepted here. This, I think, is what helps Dallas have such a unique art scene. It is still in its early development and a lot of exciting things are happening around us every day.”

The couple is excited that the culture generated around art will continue to grow in the city. “This will help shape and develop what the future of the Dallas art scene will become, which, in my opinion, will be due to the demand that will come from Dallas’ new residents who will bring their expectations of art and culture to the city,” he says.

Dustin also mentions that the Dallas Art Fair continues to grow and become more recognized as an international event as opposed to a regional fair.

“That has helped put more attention on the Dallas art scene from a global perspective,” he says. Add to that the fact that artists are advancing their art-making practices and more galleries are fine-tuning their existing programs; it all adds up to a high-quality art market that contributes to the cultural growth and development of the city.

Tom Hoitsma
Artist Tom Hoitsma, represented by Craighead Green Gallery, is enjoying the current trends since his work fits perfectly. He creates bold, colorful abstract pieces on a large scale. “While I also paint more representational landscapes, I have seen the interest in these paintings wane,” the artist says. For 2017, Hoitsma will be continuing his “deconstructed landscape” series. These paintings are vibrant, joyful and monumental in scale.

He feels that the current conflicts in the world are helping to drive the purchase of lighter and more joyful and colorful art.

Hoitsma is also enjoying the cohesive art environment in Dallas. “With many galleries moving to Dragon Street it has created a closer-knit community. Like New York City, most of the major galleries in Dallas are all located very close to each other. It makes it easy for the art buyer, the designer community and those interested in art to see a lot of different artists with a very short time investment,” he says.

Craighead Green Gallery
Craighead Green Gallery is also noticing that the turbulent and divided times are affecting artists and collectors. The desire for pleasant, calming and beautiful art is a reflection of the world today.

The gallery is celebrating its 25th year of business and will introduce four to five new artists who will bring new ideas and techniques that are unique and profound.

During its 25 years in business, Craighead Green Gallery has been a part of DADA (Dallas Art Dealer Association) and also CADD (Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas). “We have been on founding boards of several art entities and organizations,” says co-owner Kenneth Craighead. “We have watched all of these organizations grow and mature. Dallas now has a reputation for being a hub for the arts and a center for museums and galleries. The day has arrived that visitors come in and proudly announce they are visiting Dallas specifically to see the arts!”

Fellow co-owner Steve Green adds: “The organization of the Design District, the Dallas Arts District and other venues give Dallas an edge unlike many other cities. This solidarity is allowing the arts to be shared with many people who never before visited galleries or museums. It is an introduction to a different world that is much needed.”

William Campbell Contemporary Art
Like many others, William Campbell Contemporary Art, which has been in business for over 40 years, is experiencing an interest in larger work in the contemporary and minimalistic vein. The gallery, which is committed to serious art presentations and professionalism, is also enjoying the dramatic change over the past 10 years with the number of new galleries that are opening.

“The Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex has an abundance of colleges and universities with high-profile art departments and educators,” says owner Bill Campbell. “This, coupled with the influence of so many museums, nonprofit spaces, and the abundance of art galleries and art-related events, creates a fertile, art conscious environment for the area to be a leader in national and international ‘art’ destinations.”

When asked about his work with interior designers, Campbell says: “Designers and consultants are playing a much larger role in selecting artwork for their clients. It is the responsibility of the galleries to educate the designers and the designers in turn to educate themselves and their clients, with the goal of the client taking personal and intellectual ownership of the work. In other words, it speaks to the client’s personal taste and the need for them to be able to speak for and defend their choice of artwork for other than simply decorative reasons.”

Art on the Boulevard
Art on the Boulevard is seeing a trend in more hand-painted art infused with digitally produced images and artist-created collages. “There is much more contemporary work available for purchase and more venues for the artists to display their works, such as pop-up locations,” says owner Jennifer Stufflebeam.

She is also noticing that the number of artists injecting elements reminiscent of abstract expressionism from the post- WWII era is increasing, along with a revival of interest and appreciation for the art created in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s.

When asked about the art scene in Dallas, Stufflebeam says: “We live in an area that is home to a large population of working visual artists. We need to support more artists’ cooperatives and art collectives popping up in the DFW area. Some of these artists are never recognized and supported for their work. Forming a collective is the only way many of them get exposure to the public.”

Art on the Boulevard works with interior designers and welcomes them to take work being considered to their clients’ homes for trial before purchase. Stufflebeam believes designers should share trends with the galleries to pass on to their artists for consideration.

Bishop Arts Modern
“Contemporary art is much like fashion, trends tend to reappear over time,” says Cameron Smith, owner and curator of Bishop Arts Modern. “I do, however, see design trends that suggest art buyers are thirsting for originality on a larger scale. With loft living and open floor plans, I’ve been selling a tremendous number of works that range from 4-by-4 to 6-by-8 feet and even bigger. With open floor plans, large-scale art adds a grand lyrical narrative to architecture that is often much less inventive.”

Smith is proud that art in Dallas/Fort Worth has its own fiercely independent spirit. “Some of the world’s greatest collections of contemporary art were curated and nurtured by iconic Texans. Where would we be without the Nasher Sculpture Center and Raymond Nasher’s herculean gift of art to the City of Dallas? Or the Bass family in Fort Worth?” he says.

He also feels the art scene is exploding right now because there are so many incredible local artists emerging and gallerists willing to take chances, be disruptive and push the boundaries. “Art is always at the forefront of any major culture shift, and it was clear that Dallas and Fort Worth were ready for new, younger gallery curators to step onto the stage and shake things up,” Smith says. “When I made the decision to open Bishop Arts Modern gallery it was to give these brilliant undiscovered artists a full-throated, uncensored voice.”

LuminArté Fine Art Gallery
1727 E. Levee St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-914-4503
luminartegallery.com

Samuel Lynne Galleries
1105 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-965-9027
samuellynne.com

Christopher Martin Gallery
1533 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-760-1775
christophermartingallery.com

Southwest Gallery
4500 Sigma Road
Dallas, TX 75244
972-960-8935
swgallery.com

Beaudry Gallery & Framing
1425 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-880-0424
beaudry.gallery

Ginger Fox Gallery
408 N. Bishop Ave., #102
Dallas, TX 75208
214-914-4126
gingerfoxgallery.com

Jen Mauldin Gallery
408 N. Bishop Ave., #103
Dallas, TX 75208
214-954-7629
jenmauldingallery.com

Tom Hoitsma
1011 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-855-0779
craigheadgreen.com

Laura Rathe Fine Art
1130 Dragon St., #130
Dallas, TX 75207
214-761-2000
laurarathe.com

Mary Tomás Gallery
1110 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-727-5101
marytomasgallery.com

WALL Gallery
1529 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-749-0015
wallondragon.com

Crawshay Gallery
1110 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
512-981-9405
crawshaygallery.com

CINQ Gallery
905 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-716-7646
cinqgallery.com

Calina Mishay
210-602-8716
fineartamerica.com/profiles/
calina-johnson

Carlyn Ray Designs
1820 Irving Blvd.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-741-1442
carlynraydesigns.com

Craighead Green Gallery
1011 Dragon St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-855-0779
craigheadgreen.com

William Campbell
Contemporary Art

4935 Byers Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76107
817-737-9566
williamcampbellcontemporaryart
.com

LMB Art Glass
1644 Irving Blvd.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-377-8001
lmbartglass.com

Vetro Glassblowing Studio
& Gallery

701 S. Main St., #103
Grapevine, TX 76051
817-251-1668
vetroartglass.com

Holder Dane Gallery
701 S. Main St., #100
Grapevine, TX 76051
817-601-5278
holderdane.com

Bee Street Studio
6445 Cedar Springs, #103
Dallas, TX 75235
214-668-2200
beestreetstudio.com

Milan Gallery
505 Houston St.
Fort Worth, TX 76102
817-338-4278
milangallery.com

Circuit12 Contemporary
1811 E. Levee St.
Dallas, TX 75207
214-760-1212
circuit12.com

Art on the Boulevard
4919 Camp Bowie Blvd., Suite B
Fort Worth, TX 76107
817-737-6368
artontheboulevard.com

Bishop Arts Modern
518 W. Davis St.
Dallas, TX 75208
214-773-3487
bamodern.com